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More than 300 people gathered on Sunday, Jan. 29th, to show their solidarity with Muslim and immigrant brothers and sisters and to start work on VOICE's new, 5-year issue agenda, which includes:

-- building power for the 2017 statewide elections;

-- combatting intolerance;

-- defending immigrant rights;

-- changing inequitable criminal justice laws and improving public safety;

-- increasing affordable housing;

-- defending and increasing funding to ensure a high-quality public education for all;

-- standing up for workers' rights.

Among the decisions: To form a Rapid Response Team to call out and resist hate speech and actions and discriminatory government measures. Already 160+ faith and community leaders have signed up to take action. Will you step up and join us? See the commitment card below.

> Commitment Card (this will download, if not, right click and save)
Please fill out commitment card and email to voice@voiceiaf.org
> What You Can Do (pdf)
> Build Power to Win (pdf)
> VOICE's Organizing Agenda for Change

 

VOICE celebrated winning $3 Million to renovate dilapidated athletic fields at two Fairfax County High Schools serving working class youth.

VOICE turned our 550 people for affordable housing in Arlington - this time with a deeper base of teachers assistants from local schools and tenants from Columbia Pike Apartments - and challenged themselves to collect 10,000 signatures for affordable housing.

Over 300 youth, parents, and school staff gathered at West Potomac High School to celelbrate renovations at local fields and progress toward funding new high school athletic fields.

After 2 years of actions targeting banks, VOICE celebrated $30 million commmited for restoration of communities hard-hit by foreclosure.

250 people filled the streets of Reston and marched to Crescent Apartments which was threatened by redevelopment.

VOICE leaders and tenants from Layton Hall packed a Fairfax City hearing about affordable housing eventually securing a commitment for incresed relocation benefits.

VOICE sent 450 leaders from Northern Virginia to the National March for Immigration Reform Rally.

Over 90 people from seven congregations (Jewish, Christian, Muslim nd Unitarian) gathered at Temple Rodef Shalom to launch their campaign for better seniors services in the McLean/Falls Church area.

VOICE leaders from Northern Virginia Hebrew Congregation, St. John Neumann’s Catholic Church, Trinity Presbyterian, and the United Universalist Congregation of Reston gathered along with donors, allies, government representatives, religious leaders and members of the community to give thanks and recognize our success in organizing $200,000 to fund a full-time dentist at the western Fairfax County branch of the Northern Virginia Dental Clinic.

Crowd at Youth Action400 youth athletes, coaches, parents and faith leaders from Route 1 and Mount Vernon areas of Fairfax County filled Bethlehem Baptist Church calling on their County Supervisors and Park Authority Board members to improve the fields and recreation opportunities in their neighborhoods. 

Eighteen months after launching our Foreclosure & Subprime Lending Accountability campaign, VOICE's persistence paid off.  At a 400 person action at Frist Batist Church in Manassas VA we had top officials that report directly to the CEO from Bank of America, JPMorgan Chase and General Electric.  Each bank committed to come back in the fall ready to report back on their commitments to VOICE's $300-500 million reinvestment demand.

More than 300 people came out to St Mary's Episcopal Church for a V.O.I.C.E. Action calling for a new commitment by the County Board to address the affordable housing crisis in the county. Two residents -- one the owner of a licensed home-cleaning business who can afford an apartment only with the help of two incomes and the other a teacher who must live with her parents because she cannot afford an apartment -- put faces to the statistics.

After General Electric refused to negotiate seriously around VOICE's Foreclosure & Subprime Lending Accountability Campaign, 75 clergy, lay leaders, and homeowners paid a lunchtime visit to the DC offices of General Electric.  Filling the lobby of the office, VOICE leaders delivered pink slips for Jeff Immelt firing him from his position as Chair of President Obama's Jobs Council.  If he can be accountable for his damage in Prince William, how is he fit to be a leader for the nation's recovery?

VOICE filled St John Neuman Catholic Church with a broad-based constituency asking Fairfax County Supervisors Chairman Bulova and Senator Howell to work with them to get an understaffed dental clinic for low-income adults a full-time dentist.

Over 900 VOICE leaders crammed in the Auditorium of Freedom High School with Senator Mark Warner and, for the first time, representatives from Bank of America and JPMorgan Chase.  We publically made our demands to the bank representatives for accountability for the foreclosure crisis reaping havoc on Prince William County.

250 VOICE Leaders turned out to the hard-hit neighborhood of Georgetown South where the almost 33% of homes have gone into foreclosure.

VOICE Arlington Congregations organized a 100-person action to get a public bus running between the west end of Columbia Pike and the new Arlington Dept of Human Serivces Building.

More than 200 VOICE leaders loaded buses and drove 2 hours south to Richmond to challenge state budget cuts to dental care.  We restored $9 million in cuts that would have eliminated  all local health department dental programs in the Commonwealth and substantially reduced dental services at community health centers and free clinics across the state, stripping an estimated 30,000—50,000 children and adults of their dental care.

In the wake of the Ft. Hood shootings in Texas hundreds of VOICE leaders covered their heads and filled Dar Al-Hijrah Islamic Center for cross cultural one-on-one relational meetings in a stand against stereotyping of Muslims in Northern Virginia.

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